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Project Server 2007 End of Life Roadmap

Support is ending for Office 2007 servers and applications in 2017, and you need to consider plans for migration. If you are currently using Project Server 2007, note that it and these other related products will have the following end-of-support dates:

Product

End of life date

Project Server 2007

October 10, 2017

Project Portfolio Server 2007

October 10, 2017

Project 2007 Standard

October 10, 2017

Project 2007 Professional

October 10, 2017

For more information about Office 2007 servers reaching retirement, see Plan your upgrade for Office 2007 servers.

What does End of Life mean?

Project Server, like almost all Microsoft products, has a support lifecycle during which we provide new features, bug fixes, security fixes, and so on. This lifecycle typically lasts for 10 years from the date of the product’s initial release, and the end of this lifecycle is known as the product’s End of Life. When Project Server 2007 reaches its End of Life on October 10, 2017, Microsoft will no longer provide:

  • Technical support for problems that may occur.

  • Bug fixes for issues that are discovered and that may impact the stability and usability of the server.

  • Security fixes for vulnerabilities that are discovered and that may make the server vulnerable to security breaches.

  • Time zone updates.

Your installation of Project Server 2007 will continue to run after this date. However, because of the changes listed above, we strongly recommend that you migrate from Project Server 2007 as soon as possible.

What are my options?

If you are using Project Server 2007, you need to explore your migration options, which are:

  • Migrate to Project Online

  • Migrate to a newer on-premises version of Project Server (preferably Project Server 2016).

Why would I prefer to migrate to Project Online

Why would I prefer to migrate to Project Server 2016

  • I have mobile users.

  • Costs to migrate are a big concern (hardware, software, hours and effort to implement, etc.).

  • After migration, costs to maintain my environment are a big concern (for example, automatic updates, guaranteed uptime, etc.).

  • Business rules restrict me from operating my business in the cloud.

  • I need control of updates to my environment.

Note: For more information about options for moving from your Office 2007 servers, see Plan your upgrade for your Office 2007 servers. Note that Project Server does not support a hybrid configuration since Project Server and Project Online cannot share the same resource pool.

Important considerations you need to make when planning to migrate from Project Server 2007

You need to consider the following when planning to migrate from Project Server 2007:

  • Get help from a Microsoft Partner – Upgrading from Project Server 2007 can be challenging, and requires a lot of preparation and planning. It can be especially challenging if you were not the one to setup and configure Project Server 2007 originally. Luckily, there are Microsoft Partners you can turn to who do this for a living, whether you plan on migrating to Project Server 2016 or to Project Online. You can search for a Microsoft Partner to help with your migration on the Microsoft Partner Center. You can pull up a listing of all Microsoft Partner with expertise in Project by searching on the term Gold Project and Portfolio Management.

  • Plan for your customizations – Be aware that many of the customizations you have working in your Project Server 2007 environment might not work when migrating to Project Server 2016 or to Project Online. There are big differences in Project Server architecture between versions, as well as the required operating systems, database servers, and client web browsers that are supported to work with the newer version. Have a plan in place on how to test or rebuild your customizations as needed in your new environment. Planning for your upgrade will also be a good opportunity to verify if a specific customization is really needed as you move forward. Create a plan for current customizations during upgrade to SharePoint 2013 has some great general information about evaluating and planning for your current customizations when upgrading.

  • Time and patience – Upgrade planning, execution, and testing will take a lot of time and effort, especially if you are upgrading to Project Server 2016. For example, if you are migrating from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2016, you will first need to migrate from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2010, and then check your data, and then do the same thing when you migrate to each successive version. You might want to check with a Microsoft Partner to compare your costs with their estimates of how long it will take for them to do it, and at what cost.

Migrate to Project Online

If you choose to migrate from Project Server 2007 to Project Online, you can do the following to manually migrate your project plan data:

  1. Save your project plans from Project Server 2003 to .MPP format.

  2. Using Project Professional 2013, Project Professional 2016, or the Project Online Desktop Client, open each .mpp file, and then save and publish it to Project Online.

You can manually create your PWA configuration in Project Online (for example, recreate any needed custom fields or enterprise calendars). Microsoft Partners can also help you with this.

Key resources:

Resource

Description

Get started with Project Online

How to setup and use Project Online.

Project Online Service Descriptions

Information about the different Project Online plans that are available to you.

Migrate to a newer on-premises version of Project Server

While we strongly believe that you can achieve the best value and user experience by migrating to Project Online, we also understand that some organizations need to keep project data in an on-premises environment. If you choose to keep your project data on-premises, you can migrate your Project Server 2007 environment to Project Server 2010, Project Server 2013, or Project Server 2016.

We recommend that you migrate to Project Server 2016 if you can’t migrate to Project Online. Project Server 2016 includes all the features and advancements included with previous releases of Project Server, and it most closely matches the experience available with Project Online (although some features are available only in Project Online).

After completing each migration, you should check your data to make sure that it has migrated successfully.

Note: If you are considering only migrating to Project Server 2010 if you are limited to an on-premises solution, it is important to note that it only has a few more years of support left. Project Server 2010 with Service Pack 2 end of life date is 10/13/2020. For more information about end of life dates, see Microsoft Product Lifecycle Policy.

How do I migrate to Project Server 2016?

The architectural differences between Project Server 2007 and Project Server 2016 prevents a direct migration path. This means that you will need to migrate your Project Server 2007 data to the next successive version of Project Server until you upgrade to Project Server 2016.

You will need to do the following to upgrade to Project Server 2016:

  1. Step 1: Migrate from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2010.

  2. Step 2: Migrate from Project Serve 2010 to Project Server 2013.

  3. Step 3: Migrate from Project Server 2013 to Project Server 2016.

After completing each migration, you should check your data to make sure that it has migrated successfully.

Step 1: Migrate from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2010

For a comprehensive understanding of what you need to do to upgrade from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2010, see the Upgrade to Project Server 2010 content set on TechNet.

Key resources:

Resource

Description

Project Server 2010 Upgrade Overview

Get a high-level understanding of what you need to do to upgrade from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2010.

Plan to Upgrade to Project Server 2010

Look at planning considerations you need to make when upgrading from Project Server 2007 to Project Server 2010, including System Requirements.

How do I upgrade?

While details on how to upgrade can be found in the Upgrade to Project Server 2010 content set, it is important to understand that there are two distinct methods you can use to upgrade:

  • Database-attach upgrade: This method only upgrades the content for your environment, and not the configuration settings. It is required if you are upgrading from Office Project Server 2007 deployed on hardware that only supports a 32-bit server operating system. There are two types of database-attach upgrade methods:

    • Database-attach Full upgrade - Migrates the project data stored in the Office Project Server 2007 databases, plus the Microsoft Project Web App (PWA) site data stored in a SharePoint content database.

    • Database-attach Core upgrade - Migrates only the project data stored in the Project Server databases.

  • In-Place upgrade: The configuration data for the farm and all content on the farm is upgraded on the existing hardware, in a fixed order. When you start the in-place upgrade process, setup takes the entire farm offline and the Web sites and Microsoft Project Web App sites are unavailable until the upgrade is finished, and then setup restarts the server. After you begin an in-place upgrade, you cannot pause the upgrade or roll back to the previous version. It is highly suggested to make a mirrored image of your production environment and to do the in-place upgrade to this environment, and not your production environment.

Additional Resources:

Step 2: Migrate to Project Server 2013

After migrating to Project Server 2010 and verifying that your data has migrated successfully, the next step is to migrate your data to Project Server 2013.

For a comprehensive understanding of what you need to do to upgrade from Project Server 2010 to Project Server 2013, see the Upgrade to Project Server 2013 content set on TechNet.

Key resources:

Resource

Description

Overview of the Project Server 2013 upgrade process

Get a high-level understanding of what you need to do to upgrade from Project Server 2010 to Project Server 2013.

Plan to upgrade to Project Server 2013

Look at planning considerations you need to make when upgrading from Project Server 2010 to Project Server 2013, including System Requirements.

Things to know about upgrading to this version

What's new in Project Server 2013 upgrade tells you some important changes for upgrade for this version, the most notable being:

  • There is no in-place upgrade to Project Server 2013. The database-attach method is the only supported method for upgrading from Project Server 2010 to Project Server 2013.

  • The upgrade process will not only convert your Project Server 2010 data to Project Server 2013 format, but will also consolidate the four Project Server 2010 databases to a single Project Web App database.

  • Both SharePoint Server 2013 and Project Server 2013 changed to claims-based authentication from the previous version. You will need to make considerations when upgrading if you are using classic authentication. For more information, see Migrate from classic-mode to claims-based authentication in SharePoint 2013.

Additional Resources:

Step 3: Migrate to Project Server 2016

After migrating to Project Server 2013 and verifying that your data has migrated successfully, the next step is to migrate your data to Project Server 2016.

For a comprehensive understanding of what you need to do to upgrade from Project Server 2013 to Project Server 2016, see the Upgrade to Project Server 2016 content set on TechNet.

Key resources:

Resource

Description

Overview of the Project Server 2016 upgrade process

Get a high-level understanding of what you need to do to upgrade from Project Server 2013 to Project Server 2016.

Plan for upgrade to Project Server 2016

Look at planning considerations you need to make when upgrading from Project Server 2013 to Project Server 2016, including.

Things to know about upgrading to this version

Things you need to know about Project Server 2016 upgrade tells you some important changes for upgrade for this version, which include:

  • When you create your Project Server 2016 environment to which you will migrate your Project Server 2013 data, note that the Project Server 2016 installation files are included in SharePoint Server 2016. For more information, see Deploy Project Server 2016.

  • Resource plans are deprecated in Project Server 2016. Your Project Server 2013 resource plans will be migrated to Resource Engagements in Project Server 2016 and in Project Online. See Overview: Resource engagements for more information.

Migrate from Portfolio Server 2007

Project Portfolio Server 2007 was used with Project Server 2007 for portfolio strategy, prioritization, and optimization. No additional versions of Project Portfolio Server were created after this version. However, portfolio management features are available in both Project Server 2016 and the Premium version of Project Online. Data from Project Portfolio Server 2007 cannot be migrated to either. Data such as business drivers will need to be recreated.

Other resources:

Related topics

SharePoint Server 2007 End of Life Roadmap

Resources to help you upgrade from Office 2007 servers and clients

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