×
Inglês
Este artigo não está disponível no seu idioma.

Explore metrics for Workplace Analytics

Explore metrics contains a set of analytical dashboards that are the starting point to gain quick insights into your data, and identify where you want to investigate further.   In each section, there is an overview with a summary of relevant data and more in-depth data below.

Each dashboard uses several different chart types to help visualize your data in a variety of ways. Learn more about chart types.

Week in the life

Week in the Life provides a summary of weekly collaboration in the organization. You can use this section as a starting point to explore more in-depth metrics and reports.

All collaboration hours are the total number of hours that a person spent in meetings or doing email both inside and outside the organization’s configured business hours. Meeting hours is the number of hours the person spent in meetings with at least one other person. Email hours is the number of hours the person spent sending and reading email.

Why it's important

Meeting and email hours are the most basic components of collaboration. They help quantify the collaboration volume and patterns within a company, potentially highlighting an under or overly collaborative culture.

Excess incoming email becomes a distraction from work focus and a source of employee stress, particularly if combined with many meetings. Too many hours in meetings reduces the time available to complete individual work tasks, which can lead to longer working hours and employee stress.

Workplace Analytics can surface excess collaboration and help analysts identify some common causes such as:

  • Large meetings from an overly inclusive culture typically leaves all but a small minority of people actively engaged.

  • Incorrect attendees in meetings can result in unproductive collaboration time.

  • Long meetings can potentially make it difficult to retain the focus of attendees unless they are well-designed small sessions.

  • Recurring meetings may persist long after the value of the collaboration has been gained.

Workplace Analytics can also surface low levels of collaboration and help analysts identify some common causes such as:

  • Teams or organizations that operate in silos and don’t collaborate across the company.

  • A company culture that does not promote collaborative behaviors and open working styles.

After-hours meeting and email hours are the number of hours that a person spent in meetings and sending mails outside of business hours. (Workplace Analytics uses 9AM-5PM, Monday – Friday for business hours.)

Why it's important

Different roles will require different schedules, but monitoring after-hours activity can help identify employees who are at risk of getting burnt out or have an unsustainable workload.

  • Emails sent after-hours, particularly by managers, can generate overtime workload for the recipients, and can result in undue stress and poor work-life balance for employees who feel compelled to respond before the next standard workday.

  • Too much after-hours activity also hampers productivity; and employees may require down time to recharge in order to produce new ideas and fresh insights.

  • If consistent over time, overtime meeting and email hours can be an indicator of under-capacity in a group.

  • Requiring a consistently high number of after-hours work from employees due to collaboration with other time zones creates a work-life imbalance and may lower employee satisfaction and productivity.

Internal only collaboration hours are the number hours a person spent in meetings and emails only with people inside of the organization.

External collaboration hours are the number of hours a person spent in meetings and emails with at least one external person.

Why it's important

Who employees spend their time with is key to understanding if they are performing as expected in their role.

  • Internal collaboration can be an indicator of the complexity of the processes employees must navigate to complete their work.

  • External collaboration can be an indicator of external activity and relationships associated with various organizations in the company.

  • Too much time spent with either an internal or external customer, partner, or vendor may indicate a problematic relationship, particularly if it extends over a long period.

Focus hours are two or more consecutive hours in a person’s calendar that don’t contain a meeting within the company’s set business hours. Fragmented hours are non-scheduled business hours less than two hours in length.

Why it's important

  • Two-hour blocks of uninterrupted time are critical for a person to be able to focus and complete critical individual work.

  • Short blocks of free time less than two hours may not provide enough time for an employee to focus on complex tasks.

  • A low number of focus hours, particularly for independent contributors, suggests insufficient time to get work done.

  • Performance can suffer as employees work longer hours to complete work, ultimately leading to potential for stress, burnout, and employee turnover.

  • Low focus hours can also lead to poor collaboration behaviors such as multitasking during meetings.

Workweek span is the time between the person's first email or meeting and the last email or meeting in a day. (Counted Monday – Friday, with a minimum of 4 hours and a maximum of 16 hours per day.) If reported for the week, the metric is a sum for the week. If reported for the month, the metric is the weekly average.

Why it's important

Workweek span captures the span of time an employee spends in work-related activity during the work week. It provides an estimate for how many hours each week employees are engaged in work, whether they are in the office or not.

Meetings Overview

Meetings Overview provides a summary of meeting norms within your organization. You can use this section to gain insight into meeting quality by viewing metrics about specific meeting components that help determine the efficiency and effectiveness of meetings, such as duration, number of attendees, redundancy, multitasking and conflicting meeting hours.

The low-quality meeting hours overview summarizes the number of low-quality meeting hours for the organization and shows the percentage of meetings with any of the three components of low-quality meetings.

Low-quality meetings hours are the number of hours a person spent in meetings where they are either redundant, scheduled to be in conflicting meetings, or multitasking. If a person meets any of these conditions during a meeting, the meeting is counted as low-quality.

Why it’s important

Low-quality meeting hours are a good indicator of meeting culture and can help identify opportunities to make meetings more efficient or engaging. Multitasking may significantly reduce productivity.

  • Email multitasking in a meeting means attendees are not contributing at their full potential, hearing only part of the communication and/or failing to contribute their know-how to the task at hand.

  • Redundancy is an indication of underlying lack of role clarity, poor delegation, and/or a risk averse culture. Lower level employees attending a high proportion of redundant meetings could potentially feel less empowered . Senior levels may be better off by appropriately delegating meeting attendance. As a sign of career development, redundancy should diminish with tenure.

Each duration segment in the chart reflects time a person spent in meetings of that size.

Why it’s important

Large meetings aren’t always bad, but having more attendees can make it more difficult to reach a decision.

  • Large meetings leave all but a small minority of actively participating attendees disengaged. An overly collaborative and inclusive culture, which may stem from associating meeting attendance with employee importance, or be the outcome of a consensus-driven culture, may lead to a ‘safe’ invite-all (and accept-all) attitude, creating overly large meetings.

  • A high percentage of meeting hours with a large number of people can suggest poor meeting accountability and a lack of empowerment. Applying what is known as the 8-18-1800 rule can help ensure the meeting size matches the goal. Decision-making: up to 8 attendees, Brainstorming/Updates: up to 18 attendees, Informational: 1800 or more

Each duration segment in the chart reflects the total time a person spent in meetings of that length.

Why it’s important

Like large meetings, long meeting aren’t necessarily bad, but consistently having long meetings can indicate that groups lack direction or focus, aren’t structuring meetings efficiently, or are having trouble coming to a decision.

  • Meetings that regularly run over one hour can make it difficult to retain the focus of attendees, unless they are well designed small brain-storming/problem solving sessions.

  • A high percentage of meetings greater than an hour in duration suggests poor meeting planning and potential for disengagement.

Redundant meeting hours is the time a person spent in meetings where at least three distinct levels in the person's organization attended.

Why it’s important

Redundant meetings are an opportunity to downsize meetings by removing non-critical attendees. Multiple layers of management are not always needed in the same meeting.

  • Functional redundancy can indicate an underlying lack of role clarity, poor delegation, and/or a risk averse culture.

  • Lower-level employees attending a high proportion of redundant meetings could potentially feel less empowered.

  • Senior-level managers may be better off by appropriately delegating meeting attendance.

  • As a sign of career development, redundancy should diminish with tenure.

Multitasking meeting hours is the number of meeting hours where the person sent two or more emails per meeting hour, or two or more emails per meeting for meetings less than an hour.

Why it’s important

Multitasking indicates that employees may be overloaded and are using meeting time as an opportunity to catch up on email. It may also suggest that employees are not engaged in the meeting, meaning they are not essential to the meeting.

  • Multitasking can reduce productivity and attendees are not contributing at their full potential in a meeting, hearing only part of the communication and/or failing to contribute their know-how to the task at hand.

  • Managers who multi-task send a clear signal that the meeting is not important, leading others to follow.

  • Multi-tasking can become a cultural norm in organizations exhibiting collaboration overload. Insight can come from investigating norms of managers with high multitasking rates.

Conflicting meeting hours is the number of meeting hours where the person had overlapping meetings in their calendar.
The count includes the entire duration of all overlapping meetings, not just the amount of time that overlaps. (This number includes all non-declined meetings).

Why it’s important

Employees who are double-booked may not be able to fully focus or commit to either meeting.

  • Consistent conflicting meetings can result in employees feeling stressed and over-burdened. This can be especially important for managers who are overloaded with meetings and may unintentionally delay or de-prioritize their 1:1s.

  • Manager 1:1s are critical to employee development, and if ignored, may lead to employee disengagement and ultimately attrition.

Management and Coaching

Management and coaching provides a summary of collaboration between leaders, managers and employees. You can use this section to gain insight into relationships between employees and their manager and other leaders. Time with leaders and managers is often a key factor of employee engagement. By using these metrics, analysts can begin to classify groups of employees as micromanaged vs. independent, and over-coached vs. under-coached.

The Time with manager histogram compares how much time employees spend in meetings with their manager on average each week.

Why it’s important

Seeing the distribution of time employees spend with managers enables you to identify the central tendency, variation, and outliers. Long tails and multiple peaks can identify areas to perform deeper analysis. Time an employee spends with their manager can indicate positive and negative behaviors. For example:

  • Higher time with manager can indicate a good coaching and development culture where managers are focused on developing their employees.

  • A very high proportion of time in meetings with manager can indicate a culture of micro-management or lack of trust.

  • Too little time spent with managers in meetings potentially suggest insufficient team guidance, particularly for newly onboarded employees.

Further analysis can reveal how time with manager compares by employee tenure, job role, or employee satisfaction to provide insights to determine if there are opportunities for improvement in this area.

1:1 meeting hours is time that employees spend with their direct manager where they are the only two people in the meeting.

Depending on roles, it can be important for employees to have time with their manager on a regular basis to encourage open communication, feedback cycles, and opportunities for growth. Data can reveal inconsistencies in how managers collaborate with their teams and whether leaders and managers are available to their employees.

Why it’s important

  • Manager 1:1 meetings are critical to employee development, and if ignored, may lead to employee disengagement and ultimately attrition.

  • A minimum of 1 hour/month (roughly 30 minutes every 2 weeks) may be a good rule of thumb for managers and their direct reports.

  • Consistently low manager hours are a signal of poor people management.

Meeting hours with direct manager present is the time employees spend in meetings where their manager is also present.

Why it’s important

The level of day-to-day collaboration between a manager and employee can indicate whether employees feel empowered to take initiative and work independently, or if they struggle to separate themselves from their manager.

  • A very high proportion of time spent in meetings with manager suggests micro-management.

  • Too little time spent with managers in meetings potentially suggest insufficient team guidance, particularly for newly onboarded employees.

Skip-level meeting hours is the time that employees spend in meetings where their manager's manager is present.

Depending on roles, it can be important for employees to have time to meet with their skip-level manager to encourage transparency, feedback, and opportunities for growth. Data can reveal if teams have little visibility to leaders in the company, or conversely, consistently collaborate with upper level managers.

Why it’s important

Having opportunities to meeting with skip-level managers is important for employees to feel they have good visibility and understanding of how their work fits into larger organizational goals. These meetings also provide good opportunities for growth.

Employees who don't often meet with their skip-level managers may feel disconnected or disengaged.

Networks and collaboration

Networks and collaboration provides a summary of the network patterns within the company. You can use this section to explore how people are connected, and how they work together. Network size and breadth helps illustrate whether employees are connected to a variety of other people or are more insular and siloed within their immediate work group. A person's network health is also a key indicator of their engagement.

The Network diversity bubble graph shows how each organization in the company compares to the company median for network size and breadth.

  • The quadrants of the chart are delineated at the median for both network size and network breadth.

  • Bubbles represent organizations, the size of each bubble indicates the number of distinct measured employees in the corresponding organization.

  • Placement on the chart is determined by the average network size and network breadth of people in each organization

Internal network size is the average number of people with whom a person has least two meaningful interactions (a meeting or email between five or fewer people). Network connections are measured on a rolling four-week basis.

Why it’s important

Network size is a consistent gauge of successful employees, regardless of their role or level. It can be an indicator of many things depending on the scenario and organization being analyzed. Network size can indicate the following:

  • The level of complexity required to accomplish a task.

  • The levels of cross-function collaboration (high network size) or silos within a company (low network size).

  • The success of onboarding programs for new employees.

  • The success and speed at which acquisitions are integrated into a company.

Internal network breadth is the average number of organizations an employee connected with (based on meaningful interactions) during the period selected.

Why it’s important

Network breadth can indicate:

  • The level of complexity required to accomplish a task. A person connecting with more organizations can indicate higher complexity.

  • The levels of cross-function collaboration (high network breadth) or silos within a company (low network breadth).

  • The success of on-boarding programs for new employees by comparing newer employees to longer-tenured employees.

  • The success and speed at which acquisitions are integrated into a company by comparing acquired groups to the rest of the company.

Expanda suas habilidades
Explore o treinamento
Obtenha novos recursos primeiro
Ingressar no Office Insider

Essas informações foram úteis?

Obrigado por seus comentários!

Agradecemos pelos seus comentários! Parece que pode ser útil conectar você a um de nossos agentes de suporte do Office.

×