Create a hyperlink

A hyperlink is a link to a publication. When the link is clicked, the linked destination opens. The destination is frequently another Web page, but it can also be a picture, an e-mail address, or a program. The hyperlink itself can be text, a picture, or a shape.

In this article

How hyperlinks work and how they are displayed

Create a hyperlink

How hyperlinks work and how they are displayed

When you click a hyperlink, the destination is opened or run, depending on the type of destination. For example, a hyperlink to a page opens that page in a Web browser, and a hyperlink to an AVI file opens the file in a media player.

How hyperlinks are used

You can use hyperlinks to do the following:

  • Navigate to an existing file or Web page on a network, intranet, or the Internet.

  • Navigate to a file or Web page that you plan to create in the future.

  • Send an e-mail message.

  • Start a file transfer, such as downloading a file from, or uploading a file to, an FTP server.

When you point to text or a picture that contains a hyperlink, the pointer becomes a hand Pointer in the shape of a hand, which indicates that it is a link and you can click it.

What a URL is and how it works

When you create a hyperlink, its destination is encoded as a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), such as http://example.microsoft.com/news.htm or file://ComputerName/SharedFolder/FileName.htm. The following illustration defines the parts of the URL.

The part of a Uniform Resource Locator (URL)

1. Protocol

2. Web server or TE000127367

3. Path

4. File name

What is the difference between an absolute and a relative hyperlink?

An absolute URL contains a full address, including the protocol, the Web server, the path and the file name.

A relative URL has one or more missing parts. The missing information is taken from the page that contains the URL. For example, if the protocol and Web server are missing, the Web browser uses the protocol and domain — such as .com, .org, .edu — of the current page.

Web pages often use relative URLs that contain only a partial path and file name. If the files are moved to another server, any hyperlinks will continue to work as long as the relative positions of the pages remain unchanged. For example, a hyperlink on Products.htm points to a page named apple.htm in a folder named Food; if both pages are moved to a folder named Food on a different server, the URL in the hyperlink will still be correct.

Using text versus pictures

A textual hyperlink is a word or phrase that has been assigned a destination URL.

A pictorial hyperlink is a picture that has been assigned a destination URL in one of two ways:

  • The entire picture can be assigned one hyperlink. In this case, the site visitor can click any part of the picture to go to its destination. An example of a picture with a default hyperlink is a button.

  • Different parts of the picture can be assigned different hyperlinks. A picture that contains more than one hyperlink is called an image map. For example, an image map can be a picture that represents different parts of a Web site (such as the home page, a catalog page, and so on). The site visitor clicks a certain area of the image map to go to the corresponding page.

    In an image map, different hot spots take you to different destinations

How hyperlinks are displayed

Hyperlinks can be indicated in various ways. Web browsers usually underline textual hyperlinks and display them in different colors. For example, this is how a textual hyperlink can look before you click it.

Unclicked hyperlinks are often, but not always, blue and underlined.

This is how a textual hyperlink can look after you click it.

When a text hyperlink is clicked, it usually changes color.

Hyperlinks on a picture are not always visible, but a site visitor can tell that a picture has a hyperlink by positioning the pointer over it — the pointer changes appearance, usually to a pointing hand Pointer in the shape of a hand. Position your pointer over the following button.

The mouse pointer changes to indicate a hyperlink


To emphasize a hyperlink even more, you can use an animated image.

animated gif


Also, a hyperlink usually gives a visual cue about where it leads. For example, the following hyperlink can lead to a Web site's home page: Home Page

Hyperlink to a home page

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Create a hyperlink

In Microsoft Office Publisher 2007, you can create hyperlinks to files, Web pages, e-mail addresses, other pages in a Web publication, and specific locations on Web pages (sometimes called bookmarks) all by using the Insert Hyperlink button on the Standard toolbar.

You can test a hyperlink before you publish your Web site. To follow a hyperlink from your Web publication before you publish it to the Web, hold down CTRL while you click the linked text or picture.

Create a hyperlink to an existing file

  1. Select the text, picture, or shape.

  2. On the Standard toolbar, click Insert Hyperlink Button image.

  3. Under Link to, click Existing File or Web Page.

  4. Do one of the following:

    • To link to a file from your My Documents folder, click Current Folder, and then select the file that you want.

    • To link to a file that you were recently working in, click Recent Files, and then select the file that you want.

    • To link to another file on your computer, click Browse for File , and then find and select the file that you want.

      Note   The hyperlink works only on the computer that contains the file that you link to.

Create a hyperlink to a new file

  1. Select the text, picture, or shape.

  2. On the Standard toolbar, click Insert Hyperlink Button image.

  3. Under Link to, click Create New Document.

  4. Type the name of the new file, including the three-letter extension (such as .pub, .doc, or .xls).

  5. Do one of the following:

    • If you know the full path to the location where you want to create the new file, you can include the full path with the name.

    • If you don't know the full path, click Change, browse to the location that you want, and then click OK.

  6. Click either Edit the new document later or Edit the new document now.

    Note   The hyperlink works only on the computer that contains the file that you created.

Create a hyperlink to a Web page

Note   If you recently visited the Web page that you want to link to, you can start with step 3. In the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, click Browsed Pages. In the list of Web pages, click the URL that you want.

  1. In your Web browser, browse to the Web page that you want to link to.

  2. Select the URL of the Web page, and then press CTRL+C to copy it.

  3. In Publisher, select the text, the picture, or the shape that will be the hyperlink.

  4. On the Standard toolbar, click Insert Hyperlink Button image.

  5. Under Link to, click Existing File or Web Page.

  6. Click in the Address box, and then press CTRL+V to paste the URL.

Create a hyperlink to a specific location on a Web publication page

  1. Add a bookmark to your Web publication.

    How do I insert a bookmark?

    • On the Web Tools toolbar, click Bookmark Button image.

    • In the Bookmark dialog box, type a bookmark name, and then click Add.

      You can add as many unique bookmarks as you need, and later you can move them to the locations where you need them in your publication.

  2. Select the text, picture, or shape.

  3. On the Standard toolbar, click Insert Hyperlink Button image.

  4. In the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, click Bookmark.

  5. In the Select Place in Document dialog box, click the bookmark that you want to link to, and then click OK.

Create a hyperlink to an e-mail address

  1. Select the text or picture.

  2. On the Standard toolbar, click Insert Hyperlink Button image.

  3. Under Link to, click E-mail Address.

  4. Do one of the following:

    • Type the e-mail address that you want in the E-mail address box.

    • Select an e-mail address from the Recently used e-mail addresses list.

  5. In the Subject box, type the subject of the e-mail message.

Note   Some Web browsers and e-mail programs may not recognize the subject line.

Create a hyperlink to another page in your publication

  1. Select the text or picture.

  2. On the Standard toolbar, click Insert Hyperlink Button image.

  3. Under Link to, click Place in This Document.

  4. Select the page that you want.

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Applies To: Publisher 2007



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