Save a document in Word

You can use the Save and Save As commands to store your work, and you can adjust the settings that Microsoft Office Word uses to save your documents.

The way that you save a document and the format that you save it in depends on how you plan to use the document. For example, if the document is for your own use and you never expect to open it in a previous version of Microsoft Office Word, the simplest way to save it is to use the Save command, using all the default settings.

However, if you are posting the document for others to open, if people reading your document are using software other than Microsoft Office Word, or if you intend to open the document on another computer or mobile device, you need to choose how and where you want to save the document.

If you commonly save documents in a particular place or format, you can adjust settings so that Word defaults to these choices.

If you're looking for info about saving as a PDF, go to Save or convert to PDF.

What would you like to do?

  1. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Button image , or press CTRL+S.

  2. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

    Word saves the document in a default location. To save the document in a different location, select another folder or location.

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To prevent overwriting an existing document, use the Save As command to create a copy of the existing document with a new name. You might want to do this, for example, when you have a form letter, lease document or any other situation where an existing document will provide all the basic content for a new document (and you don't want to lose the existing document).

  1. Open the document that you want to use as the basis for the new document.

  2. Click File, and then click Save As.

  3. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

    • Word saves the document in a default location.

    • To save the document in a different location, click another folder or location in the Save As dialog box.

  4. Edit the document the way that you want.

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If you save your document in the default file format in Microsoft Office Word 2007, Word 2010, Word 2013 and Word 2016, users of previous versions of Word must install the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2007 File Formats to open the document. Alternatively, you can save the document in a format that can be opened directly in previous versions of Word  — but formatting and layout that depend on new features in Microsoft Office Word 2007, Word 2010, Word 2013 or Word 2016 will not be available in the previous version of Word.

  1. Click File, and then click Save As.

  2. Click Word 97-2003 Format.

  3. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

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If you are creating a document for others, you can make them readable and not editable, or you can make them readable and editable. If you want a document to be readable but not editable, save the document as a PDF or XPS file, or save it as a webpage. If you want your document to be readable and editable, but prefer a file format other than .docx or .doc, you can use formats such as, plain text (.txt), Rich Text Format (.rtf), and OpenDocument Text (.odt).

PDF and XPS   - PDF and XPS are formats that people can read in widely available viewing software. These formats preserve the page layout of the document.

Webpages   - Webpages are displayed in a web browser. This format does not preserve the page layout of your document. As someone resizes the browser window, the layout of the document changes. You can save the document as a conventional webpage (HTML format) or as a single-file webpage (MHTML format). With HTML format, any supporting files (such as images) are stored in a separate folder that is associated with the document. With MHTML format, all supporting files are stored together with the document in one file.

Note: You can save a document in other formats that can be opened by a number of text editing programs. Among these formats are plain text (.txt), Rich Text Format (.rtf), and OpenDocument Text (.odt). However, saving a Microsoft Office Word document in these formats does not reliably preserve the formatting, layout, or other features of the document. Use these formats only if you don't mind losing these aspects of your document. You can choose these formats from the list in the Save As dialog box.

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What would you like to do?

  1. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save Button image , or press CTRL+S.

  2. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

    Word saves the document in a default location. To save the document in a different location, select another folder in the Favorite Links if your computer is running Windows Vista, or in the Save in list if your computer is running Microsoft Windows XP. If you want to change the default location where Word saves documents, click the Adjust settings for saving documents tab in this article.

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To prevent overwriting an existing document, use the Save As command to create a copy of the existing document with a new name. You might want to do this, for example, when you have a form letter, lease document or any other situation where an existing document will provide all the basic content for a new document (and you don't want to lose the existing document).

  1. Open the document that you want to use as the basis for the new document.

  2. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  3. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

    • Word saves the document in a default location.

    • To save the document in a different location, click another folder in the Save in list in the Save As dialog box. If you want to change the default location where Word saves documents, adjust the settings for saving documents.

  4. Edit the document the way that you want.

Tip: To make it easy to use one document as the basis for others, save the document where templates are stored. In the Save As dialog box, click Templates if your computer is running Windows Vista, or click Trusted Templates if your computer is running Windows XP, and then click Save. When you want to create a new document, in the New Document dialog box, double-click New from Existing.

Another way to use one document as the basis for others is to save it as a template.

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  1. Use the Save or Save As command to save the document to a folder that you can find easily.

  2. Insert a blank, writable CD into the CD recorder. Use one of the following:

    • Recordable compact disc (CD-R)

    • Rewritable compact disc (CD-RW)

      With rewritable CDs, you can copy data to and erase data from the CD multiple times.

  3. Click Start, and then do one of the following, depending on your computer's operating system:

    Windows Vista

    1. Click Computer.

    2. Click Folders to expand the list of folders, and then click the arrow next to Computer to expand the list of disk drives.

    3. Click the files or folders that you want to copy to the CD, and drag them to the CD recording drive in the list of folders.

      To select more than one file, hold down CTRL while you click the files that you want.

    4. In the Burn a disc dialog box, click either Live File System or Mastered, depending on the CD format that you want to use. If you want help with this, click Which CD or DVD format should I choose?.

    5. Type a name for the CD in the Disc title box, and then click Next.

    6. Follow the instructions on your screen.

    Windows XP

    1. Click My Computer.

    2. On the View menu, point to Explorer Bar, and then click Folders.

    3. Click the files or folders that you want to copy to the CD, and drag them to the CD recording drive in the list of folders.

      To select more than one file, hold down CTRL while you click the files that you want.

    4. Double-click the CD recording drive. Windows XP displays a temporary area where the files are located before they are copied to the CD. Verify that the files and folders that you intend to copy to the CD appear under Files Ready to be Written to the CD.

    5. Under CD Writing Tasks, click Write these files to CD. Windows starts the CD Writing Wizard. Follow the instructions in the wizard.

  • Do not try to copy more files to the CD than it will hold. Check the CD packaging to see the capacity of each CD. For files that are too large to fit on a CD, you can copy files to a recordable DVD (DVD-R or DVD+R) or rewritable DVD (DVD-RW or DVD+RW). However, Windows XP does not support copying to a DVD, so you must use DVD authoring software.

  • Make sure that you have enough disk space on your hard disk to store the temporary files that are created during the CD-writing process. For a standard CD, Windows reserves up to 700 megabytes (MB) of the available free space. For a high-capacity CD, Windows reserves up to 1 gigabyte (GB) of the available free space.

  • After you copy files or folders to the CD, you can view the CD to confirm that the files were copied.

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  1. Insert the memory device into a USB port.

  2. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  3. Do one of the following:

    Windows Vista

    1. Click Computer.

    2. Under Devices with Removable Storage, double-click the USB memory device.

Windows XP

  1. Click My Computer.

  2. Double-click the USB memory device.

  1. In the File name box, type a name for the document.

  2. Click Save.

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  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. Locate the network folder.

    • If a network folder is mapped to your computer, in the list of locations, click Computer if your computer is running Windows Vista, or click My Computer if your computer is running Windows XP, and then click the name of the folder.

      Note: You can easily access a network folder by mapping it to your computer. If you don't already have a folder mapped, you can click Tools in the Save As dialog box, click Map Network Drive, and then follow the instructions in the Map Network Drive dialog box.

    • If you know the name and location of the shared network folder, type it in the File name box, starting with two backslashes, and then press ENTER.

  3. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

Windows Vista

If you are saving the document in a document library on a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site, do the following:

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. Locate the Web server.

  3. In the File name box, type the URL of the site, and then press ENTER.

  4. Double-click the name of the document library.

  5. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

If you are saving the document on a Web site on MSN, do the following:

  1. In the File name box, type the URL of your MSN site, and then press ENTER.

  2. Type your user name and password to log on to the site.

If you are saving the document in a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) location that you already configured, do the following:

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. In the Save As dialog box, expand the Folders list, and click Computer.

  3. Double-click the FTP location in the Network Location list.

    Note: FTP is a way of opening and saving files on Web servers. If you know the name and log-on credentials for a server, you can add the server to your Network locations by right-clicking Computer and then clicking Add a Network Location in the Save As dialog box.

Windows XP

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. Locate the Web server.

    • If you are saving the document in a document library on a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site, type the URL of the site in the File name box, and then press ENTER. Double-click the name of the document library.

    • If you are saving the document on a Web site on MSN, click My Network Places, and then double-click My Web Sites on MSN. Type your password if necessary, and then double-click the name of the site.

    • If you are saving the document in a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) location that you already configured, select FTP Locations in the Save in list, and then double-click the FTP location.

      Note: FTP is a way of opening and saving files on Web servers. If you know the name and log-on credentials for a server, you can add the server to your FTP locations by clicking Add/Modify FTP Locations in the Save As dialog box.

  3. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

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If you save your document in the default file format in Office Word 2007, users of previous versions of Word must install the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2007 File Formats to open the document. Alternatively, you can save the document in a format that can be opened directly in previous versions of Word  — but formatting and layout that depend on new features in Office Word 2007 will not be available in the previous version of Word.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. Click Word 97-2003 Format.

  3. Type a name for the document, and then click Save.

Top of Page

If you are creating a document for others you can make them readable and not editable, or you can make them readable and editable. If you want a document to be readable but not editable, save the document as a PDF or XPS file, or save it as a Web page. If you want your document to be readable and editable, but prefer a file format other than .docx or .doc, you can use formats such as, plain text (.txt), Rich Text Format (.rtf) and OpenDocument Text (.odt)

PDF and XPS    PDF and XPS are formats that people can read in widely available viewing software. These formats preserve the page layout of the document.

Web pages    Web pages are displayed in a Web browser. This format does not preserve the page layout of your document. As someone resizes the browser window, the layout of the document changes. You can save the document as a conventional Web page (HTML format) or as a single-file Web page (MHTML format). With HTML format, any supporting files (such as images) are stored in a separate folder that is associated with the document. With MHTML format, all supporting files are stored together with the document in one file.

Note: You can save a document in other formats that can be opened by a number of text editing programs. Among these formats are plain text (.txt), Rich Text Format (.rtf), OpenDocument Text (.odt) and Microsoft Works (.wps). However, saving an Office Word 2007 document in these formats does not reliably preserve the formatting, layout, or other features of the document. Use these formats only if you don't mind losing these aspects of your document. You can choose these formats in the Save as type list in the Save As dialog box.

You can save as a PDF or XPS file from a 2007 Microsoft Office system program only after you install an add-in. For more information, see Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. Click PDF or XPS.

  3. In the File name box, type a name for the file.

  4. In the Save as type list, select PDF or XPS.

  5. If the document is for viewing online only, you can compress the file size by clicking Minimum size (publishing online) next to Optimize for.

  6. If you want to save just a portion of the document, if you want to include revision marks or document properties, or if you want to automatically create hyperlinks to headings or bookmarks in the document, click Options, and then click the options that you want to use.

  7. Click Publish.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

    If you are publishing the document to a Web server, browse to the server name, and click it (do not double-click it).

  2. In the File name box, type a name for the file.

  3. In the Save as type box, click Web Page or Singe File Web Page.

Note: If you save the document as a Web page (HTML format) and later want to move it or send it as an e-mail message attachment, you must remember to include the folder that contains any supporting files. This folder has the same name as the file name of the document.

  1. Click Save.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. In the File name box, type a name for the file.

  3. In the Save as type box, click OpenDocument Text.

Note: If you want to retain a version of the file as a Word document, you must save it as a Word document (for example, .docx file format) before you close Word 2007.

  1. Click Save.

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  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button Office button image , and then click Save As.

  2. Click Save.

  3. In the Save files in this format box, click the file format that you want to use.

  4. Next to the Default file location box, click Browse, and then click the folder where you want to save your files.

    Note: These options control the default behavior the first time that you use the Open, Save, or Save As command when you start Word. Whenever you save a document, you can override these settings by specifying a different location or format in the Open, Save, or Save As dialog box.

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