Insert an object

You can insert an object, such as a Word document or PowerPoint slide, directly into a worksheet—making it easy to display or share. You can display the object’s contents or just show it as an icon. Either way, the object is stored in the Excel file. Once it's embedded, you can open it directly from Excel, automatically using the program with which it was created.

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Embed an object in a worksheet

  1. Click inside the cell of the spreadsheet where you want to insert the object.

  2. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Object.

    The Object option is on the Insert tab.
  3. Click the Create from File tab.

    The "Create from File" tab on the Object dialog box.
  4. Click Browse, and select the file you want to insert.

  5. If you want to insert an icon into the spreadsheet instead of show the contents of the file, select the Display as icon check box. If you don’t select any check boxes, Excel shows the first page of the file. In both cases, the complete file opens with a double click. Click OK.

    Note: After you add the icon or file, you can drag and drop it anywhere on the worksheet. You can also resize the icon or file by using the resizing handles. To find the handles, click the file or icon one time.

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Insert a link to a file

You might want to just add a link to the object rather than fully embedding it. You can do that if your workbook and the object you want to add are both stored on a SharePoint site, a shared network drive, or a similar location, and if the location of the files will remain the same. This is handy if the linked object undergoes changes because the link always opens the most up-to-date document.

Note: If you move the linked file to another location, the link won’t work anymore.

  1. Click inside the cell of the spreadsheet where you want to insert the object.

  2. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Object.

    The Object option is on the Insert tab.
  3. From the File tab, click Create.

  4. Click Browse, and then select the file you want to link.

  5. Select the Link to file check box, and click OK.

    On the "Create from File" tab, select "Link to file."

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Create a new object from inside Excel

You can create an entirely new object based on another program without leaving your workbook. For example, if you want to add a more detailed explanation to your chart or table, you can create an embedded document, such as a Word or PowerPoint file, in Excel. You can either set your object to be displayed right in a worksheet or add an icon that opens the file.

This embedded object is a Word document.
  1. Click inside the cell of the spreadsheet where you want to insert the object.

  2. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Object.

    The Object option is on the Insert tab.
  3. On the Create New tab, select the type of object you want to insert from the list presented. If you want to insert an icon into the spreadsheet instead of the object itself, select the Display as icon check box.

    The Create New tab in the Object dialog box.
  4. Click OK. Depending on the type of file you are inserting, either a new program window opens or an editing window appears within Excel.

  5. Create the new object you want to insert.

    When you’re done, if Excel opened a new program window in which you created the object, you can work directly within it.

    You can edit the embedded Word document directly in Excel.

    When you’re done with your work in the window, you can do other tasks without saving the embedded object. When you close the workbook your new objects will be saved automatically.

    Note: After you add the object, you can drag and drop it anywhere on your Excel worksheet. You can also resize the object by using the resizing handles. To find the handles, click the object one time.

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See Also

Hyperlinks in worksheets

Embedded files or objects found

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