Open a presentation or associated file sent to me by e-mail

What do you want to do?

Open a presentation with a .ppz file name extension

Open a presentation with a .pps file name extension

Open a PowerPoint 2010 presentation in an earlier version of PowerPoint

Play a sound file

Play a movie file

Important: You will not be able to open .pps attachments directly from within the mail application, in each of the following circumstances:

  • You are running Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack (SP) 2, using Outlook Express.

  • You are running Microsoft Windows Vista, using Windows Mail.

Open a presentation with a .ppz file name extension

You received a file with a .ppz extension by e-mail, and you can't open it by using PowerPoint 2010.

A .ppz file could be a PowerPoint animation file (a streaming format intended for Web use rather than for exchanging presentations with others), but most likely it is a "packaged" PowerPoint file created by the Pack and Go Wizard. The Pack and Go Wizard is not available or supported in PowerPoint 2010.

In PowerPoint 2002 and earlier, the Pack and Go Wizard made it possible to package one or more presentations, including linked files and embedded fonts, into a single .ppz file. In addition, the Pack and Go Wizard created a file called pngsetup.exe that allowed the recipient to unpackage the .ppz file. Without the pngsetup.exe file, a Windows file compression tool such as WinZip would be required to open the .ppz file.

To copy your PowerPoint 2010 presentation to a CD, see Package a presentation for CD.

Open a presentation with a .pps file name extension

You received a PowerPoint Show (.pps) file by e-mail, and you can't open it. Because PowerPoint 2010 and PowerPoint 2007 support the .pps file format, you need to install on your computer PowerPoint 2010, PowerPoint 2007, or the free PowerPoint Viewer, which lets you view full featured presentations.

For information about how to install PowerPoint Viewer see Install and run PowerPoint Viewer 2007.

Open a PowerPoint 2010 presentation in an earlier version of PowerPoint

You can't open a PowerPoint 2010 presentation that you received by e-mail. If you do not have PowerPoint 2010 installed on your computer, yet you have an earlier version of PowerPoint installed, you can do one of two things:

Save and resend the PowerPoint 2010 presentation in a PowerPoint 97-2003 format

When you ask the person who sent the presentation to save the file in PowerPoint 97-2003 format, use the table below that shows the various 2010 file formats and the corresponding PowerPoint 97-2003 file formats:

If you can't open this type of PowerPoint 2010 file

Ask the sender to save the file as

PowerPoint Presentation (.pptx)

A PowerPoint 97-2003 Presentation (.ppt)

XPS Document Format (.xps)

A PowerPoint 97-2003 Presentation (.ppt)

PowerPoint Template (.potx)

A PowerPoint 97-2003 Template (.pot)

Office Theme (.thmx)

A PowerPoint 97-2003 Template (.pot)

PowerPoint Show (.ppsx)

A PowerPoint 97-2003 Show (.pps)

Download and install updates and converters for earlier versions of PowerPoint

First you must download the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint File Formats.

  • On the computer that has a version of PowerPoint earlier than PowerPoint 2010 installed, do one of the following:

    • Download and install the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint File Formats from the Microsoft Download Center.

      After you install the updates and converters, all PowerPoint 2010 presentations that you open are automatically converted so that you can edit and save them. Features and formatting that are specific to PowerPoint 2010 may not be editable.

    • Open your PowerPoint 2010 presentation. If you have not yet downloaded and installed the Compatibility Pack, you will be presented with instructions about how to do so.

      Important: PowerPoint 97-2003 does not recognize SmartArt graphics and visual objects that are available in PowerPoint 2010, and will convert them to images to maintain their appearance. You cannot edit or change certain aspects of these images, such as line width, fill color, and other PowerPoint 2010 specific properties. However, when you reopen the presentation in PowerPoint 2010, you are able to edit the SmartArt graphics and other visual objects once again.

Play a sound file

You received a PowerPoint 2010 presentation by e-mail that contains a sound file, and although you can run the presentation, you can't play the sound file that appears on a slide because the sound file is linked to (rather than embedded in) the presentation.

Ask the person who sent the presentation to you to do the following:

  1. Copy the sound file into the same folder that contains the presentation.

  2. Use the Package a presentation for CD feature to update the links and bundle the associated files.

  3. Resend the presentation to you by e-mail.

Play a movie file

You received a PowerPoint 2010 presentation by e-mail that contains a movie file, and although you can run the presentation, you can't play the movie file that appears on a slide because the movie file is linked to (rather than embedded in) the presentation. By design, movie files are always linked to and are never part of the presentation.

Ask the person who sent the presentation to you to do the following:

  1. Copy the movie file into the same folder that contains the presentation.

  2. Use the Package a presentation for CD feature to update the links and bundle the associated files.

  3. Resend the presentation to you by e-mail.

Share Facebook Facebook Twitter Twitter Email Email

Was this information helpful?

Great! Any other feedback?

How can we improve it?

Thank you for your feedback!

×